Jump to content
The Hidden Fortress
mad

NatureNerd's corner

Recommended Posts

looking at the fluctuation thread, i realised we need this thread.

 

i hope Mad agrees :lol:

 

it starts with this:

 

So, why do ducks float and fish don't? :teaser:

 

you sure you want to ask? you don't have to read this unless you really want to but I'll answer anyway, to get in practice! :teaser:

 

 

Dear Boo,

 

ducks' feathers have an oily coating from their preen gland, which prevents their feathers getting waterlogged - a combination of this, air held within the feathers, and light body weight for volume (ie full of air) means they float. Fish have swim bladders (mostly, apart from most sharks) which they can fill with O2 from their blood, or express it from the bladders - thus, like a diver using a weight belt, they maintain neutral buoyancy. To go deeper, they need less air in the system. The bladder also acts as a reservoir of oxygen as they 'sleep'. They steer with their pectoral fins and power along with tail fins - similarly diving birds use theri feet to give them the power and steer with their wings (watch the penguins!) Whales, incidentally, virtually empty their lungs to dive deep, although their blood is saturated with O2 thus avoiding the bends. Sharks generally don't have swim bladders, so have to keep swimming to keep an oxygen flow over their gills. :oh:

 

love

naturenerd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:flower:

 

So its true that if sharks sleep, they die?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question for naturenerd too :yes:

 

I read the other day that hedgehogs may be extinct in the UK in the next 20 years. Is that true? I know there is a lack of habitat for them with more and more land being developed, but are things really that bad? I would hope that with a rise in organic farming, hedgehogs would be in demand as natural slug controllers - the thought of Britain without hedgehogs is very sad. I wonder whether there are captive breeding projects anywhere, working to tip the scales in the little guys' favour?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Britain without HEDGEHOGS?!? :mood:

 

Jeeze, if we can bring back our condors, hopefully you guys can save the hedgehogs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

no hedgehogs?? :neutral::s

 

found this pic on the web a while ago and kept it around …

 

igel.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aww!

 

Thanks, Mackie, for the 'corner' ( I think :crit:) If you think it's needed, it probably is! All questions will be answered, somehow!!!!

 

 

NatureNerd says:

 

Sharks - if they stop swimming, some sharks can suffocate. Others have managed to develop a method of pumping water over their gills to maintain the oxygen supply. They only found this out in about the last 10 years, before that they thought all sharks had to keep going relentlessly.

 

Hedgehogs - apparently declining by a fifth every five years - hence the date (Durham Wildlife Trust). That's IF the decline continues at the same rate. What's doing it? There are a number of surveys going on to find out why - I suspect a combination of habitat reduction, use of chemicals (and there is sadly no great shift to organics, really. Especially where slugs are concerned, in gardens - slug pellets are horrid) and that a lot get flattened on the roads. It may be that changes in the climate mean that food availability has changed at critical times, (hotter summers = drier ground = harder to get worms etc) and the warming up means they are likely to be hibernating less and waking up more. And then need to find food, to regain critical weight lost in waking up. Stress is also a factor in this. Worms are fewer, because of NewZealand flatworms, in a lot of Britain. Hope it can be sorted - more wildlife friendly gardens, more tolerance of pests such as slugs and snails, less tidying up (oh that the locals here would get the idea that frenetic begonia bedding is NOT the way to go), and reduce the carbon footprint, folks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, Mackie, for the 'corner' ( I think :crit:) If you think it's needed, it probably is!

i think a lot of this is something i would like to be able to find later on, and you know how it is - with our way of meandering, it would be evenly spread over all forums and about a hundred threads :p

 

(i guess i should have asked first, though :blush2::neutral: )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

s'okay!!! shouldhave done it meself, really - guess there's bits all over the place that will actually belong here, and if i ever have time i'll try to find them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool thread. So sad and disturbing about the hedgehogs. I wonder if we have them in Oregon. Our place would be perfect...it's just chick full of slugs ( the state bug you know) and we don't do ANY tidying up. :roflmao:

 

Mad, do youhave coyotes over there? Foxes, right? We lost all our chickens to a fox one night. She was beautiful, we had seen her around for a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when i was housesitting for my brother ten years ago a marten came each night and took one of the chickens. he had found a way to get into the henhouse, and each morning i found the remains of one of the hens. :neutral:

 

in the end the remaining hens slept in the trees, and the cock stayed on the ground with the few who were too old to get up into the branches. i found that quite brave of him.

 

i was quite sick and tired of burying chicken, too :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Foxes we have, no coyotes!!! (at least I don't know of any being reported, tho' we do have puma, lynx, leopard.....but no officially!)

They are a pain with chickens, and ducks - most of my friends with poultry have to keep them locked in at night, or in netted enclosures. Doesn't toadly safeguard them, but it helps. Martens (of the pine variety) do sometimes cause problems, (in Ireland, they do seem to take poultry)but mostly in Scotland they are too shy to come close... except in pursuit of jam and peanut butter sandwiches....

 

cool cockerel!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
but mostly in Scotland they are too shy to come close... except in pursuit of jam and peanut butter sandwiches....

erm … what???? :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, who doesn't like PB&J?! :roflmao:

 

Mad, you have leopards in Scotland??!!!! ( has anyone seen Bringing Up Baby? OPne of my all time faves!)

We used to ocassionally see exotic antelope and once a giraffe while passing a certain spot on the highway. There was a tiny wildlife park near there & they had periodic escapes. It was kind of thrilling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×