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The Hidden Fortress

The Book Bag


Mackie
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I've finished "Stella: Unrepentant Madam" An interesting account of an American woman who took her expertise in the world's oldest profession (management side) to, among other places, Victoria, B.C. I bought the book in Victoria, along with a copy of "A Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains", by Isabella Bird, which I've started but not quite finished.

 

And I'm reading "The Devil Kissed Her", a biography of Mary Lamb.

 

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i am reading a book about a russian-german family, "Rita's people". it is a lesson in european history, and an intriguing family history - they were mennonites, and had been forced to leave the russian western border in teh 1920s, and settle in the far east, close to Omsk. after the fall of the USSR they have gone west, and live in germany.

 

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am reading naguib mahfouz's 'palace walk' - the first of his cairo trilogy. it's beautifully written. i finished about 150 days in 2 days and then started working. since then i've read five pages. :huh: it's really infuriating at parts but intentionally so. gripping and compulsive.

 

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I'm rereading the first Amerlia Peabody book by Elizabeth Peters. I got her "Compendium" companion book to the series and remembered how much fun the early books were.

 

 

I'm also continuing to read the Hungry Planet book and a bio of Hattie McDaniels.

 

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"Mistress of Modernism", a biography of Peggy Guggenheim. I really enjoyed "Art Collector", another take on this lady. I've found it very valuable to read more than one biography of people that I find interesting (when I can find them), because there are usually a number of facets to their stories, and each biographer seems to be intrigued with different aspects of the subject's personality and/or their relationship and reactions to the societies they lived in.

 

 

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Ithink I enjoy almost any kind of book if it's well written, with some humor preferable.

I think Georgette Heyer is brilliant and have enjoyed Phyliss Whitney, Daphne Dumaurier, Mary Stewart in the past. Are those in the Romance genre?

 

I have loved all of the above, particularly Georgette Heyer - I've reread my copies so often the covers are falling apart.

 

I really, really love P.G. Wodehouse, too, and the Wooster/Jeevesverse is another place I go for comfort reading. I also like E.F. Benson, the Mapp/Lucia books and some of the "Dodo" stories as well. Benson is sometimes even funnier than Wodehouse, I think, but Wodehouse's humor is gently ridiculous, and Benson's can be pretty pointed, and sometimes quite nasty. (And I find it really interesting that Benson could also write a hell of a ghost story, or vampire story, too.)

 

 

 

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starting to read "eats, shoots and leaves." :oh: insanely funny book on PUNCTUATION. :lol: highly recommended to one and all. i think it's going to belong with wodehouse and douglas adams on my bookshelf. :joy:

 

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Mackie, Martha Grimes is one of my favorites, I've never read an American set one. I like the whole British atmosphere of the Richard Jury ones. The Lamorna Wink is my favorite because it references one of my all time favorite movies The Uninvited. A ghost story set in Cornwall.
i know that movie, or at least i think so, it is an old one, isn't it?

 

the first of the american Martha Grimes is called "The End of The Pier". (i like the Richard Jury ones, too)

 

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The M. C. Beaton Highlands series "hero" is Constable Hamish MacBeth of Lochdubh. And most of the time, it appears he has a fake job, and likes it that way. Except when he's playing detective, which he is, of course, not supposed to be doing.

 

i just read an incredibly beautiful book on painting by an indian painter called paresh maity. it has a lot of his paintings in reproduction. the man's watercolours and oils are just amazing. i'll see if i can scan a few of them. it's just inSANEly beautiful. :swoon:

 

Until you can:

 

http://www.eindiaart.com/eparesh_maity.htm

 

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I got a book by Donna Andrews called Murder with Peacocks that is fresh and snappy and so entertaining. Very light an witty but such an appealing "voice" the heroine has.

AND, just by accident I picked up the first in the series! :jump:

I highly recommend this book if you want a fun escape and a laugh out loud read.

 

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i just read Am Beispiel meines Bruders by Uwe Timm, and discovered that it even has come out in english translation, as well as several others of his books. he is one of my favourite contemporary german writers - he can be really funny, as in Johannisnacht or Die Erfindung der Currywurst. (i am leaving the titles in german so they look exotic for you guys :p the links are for the translations on amazon)

 

even when he is funny, there is always a serious streak somewhere in the story, and his writing is wonderful. he has published quite a lot, so i shouldn't be surpoirsed to see him tranlated, but i still am :lol:

 

"Am Beispiel meines Bruders" is of course not a funny story, but his attempt to find out how the death of his older brother, who fell at the age of nineteen, being a member of the SS Totenkopf division, has affected his and his family's life. it is a slim book, it took me one day to read it, but i think it is going to stay with me for quite some time.

 

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