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languages - always good for a confusion …


Mackie
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quotes from "what are you wearing today?"

 

I think I'm learning...a "jumper" is a sweater or sweatshirt, right Hobbie? Here it's a dress with no sleeves & a scoopy neckline that you wear a shirt under, like school girls wore in the 50's.

 

it is really funny (and fun) how the same words have very different meanings - and both languages are supposed to be "english" :p

 

Well I guess it's English and "Amurican". :lol: then there is that whole "fanny" thing! :shock:

 

and i thought "jumper" was American while "pullover" was British... :huh2::roll:

 

I think I'm learning...a "jumper" is a sweater or sweatshirt, right Hobbie? Here it's a dress with no sleeves & a scoopy neckline that you wear a shirt under, like school girls wore in the 50's.

Now the garment you describe as a jumper, we would call a pinafore.

 

 

 

 

Now the garment you describe as a jumper, we would call a pinafore.

:roflmao: i feel the need for a new thread coming on :yes:

 

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One that I always muddle Americans with is using "holiday" rather than "vacation".

A holiday in the UK is any time taken off work or any time that you go away for a break, while for Americans that would be a vacation. As far as I understand it, in America a holiday would be Christmas or Labor Day, etc - "legal holidays", or what what we in the UK call "public holidays" or "bank holidays".

 

A "For the Holidays" section in a UK shop might consist of sun-tan lotion, swimming costumes (or "bathing suits", if you're on the other side of the pond) and other beach wear, whilst in America "For the Holidays" might herald a display of Christmas things. I like the "holiday season" referred to in US culture, emcompassing Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas and New Year - it makes the winter sound like one long celebration.

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THE BOARD ATE MY POST! :wail:

 

no matter. i can regurgitate. :manic::evildb:

 

1. i feel sorry for the word 'fanny'. from an innocent name for girls (who else read enid blyton's 'faraway tree' series here?) to a body part to a sexual organ - what a long, strange trip it's been. :p

 

2. the one that gets me is football. which turns to soccer in america. while football in america turns to something akin to rugby. which is not football and not soccer. :huh: it's all very confusing.

 

3. another one that's an interesting twist is 'petticoat'. in india it means a long skirt with a tie-up waist that is worn under the sari like a slip. :roll:

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Here a petticoat is a fullish underskirt, a slip is usually a full undergarment. Hardly anyone wears either anymore. A panty is little underpants (legs) but most younger women wear thongs ( butt floss). When I was a kid thongs were a type of shoe. Ithink some people call them shower shoes or flip flops.

 

What is a vest in Europe. It's a formal outer garment part of a 3 piece suit. Or sometimes a knitted sleeveless sweater from your granny.

 

Do you have cumberbunds? (sp?)

 

Shoes: sling backs, mules, pumps, Mary Janes, F*@# me shoes, moccassins, flats, stillettos.....and a whole lot of names for sneakers, athletic shoes, deck shoes, tennis shoes, basketball shoes....

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i knew this would be a Jude theme!!! :smooch:

 

A panty is little underpants (legs) but most younger women wear thongs ( butt floss).

:lol:

 

What is a vest in Europe. It's a formal outer garment part of a 3 piece suit. Or sometimes a knitted sleeveless sweater from your granny.
we say "weste" (prounced with a v :p ), and it is the formal garment thingy (or its less formal equivalent).

 

Do you have cumberbunds? (sp?)
Kummerbund in German!! :lol: only who would want to wear one??? :shock:

(it is this bandage like thingy gentlemen are supposed to wear with their evening dress, right? the kind that looks like they had a painful accident to their middle part, and try to cover it up with a lot of stylish fabric :p in Carlos Saura's "Bodas de Sangre" one of the flamenco dancers is dressing in one, and does it as a dance - that is really cool :p )

Shoes: sling backs, mules, pumps, Mary Janes, F*@# me shoes, moccassins, flats, stillettos.....and a whole lot of names for sneakers, athletic shoes, deck shoes, tennis shoes, basketball shoes....

:lol: yes, the area has a LOT of those :p but not moi. :no::duck:

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In a wedding episode of Buffy, Xander had a great comment on cumberbunds. He couldn't get his on and he said how that was unacceptable as NO one must see where his pants met his shirt! He actually referred to it as "Das Kummerbund"! :lol:

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:lol: here a vest is what you wear under your blouse/shirt when it is very cold. The sleeveless jumper thing we used to call a tank-top, can't think what they are called now.

 

Your talk of thongs amused me, Jude - at the weekend my mum went to visit an open-garden where the owners are known for gardening in the nude, although - according to my mum - when there are visitors the gentleman wears a 'throng'! :lol::angel:

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:lol: here a vest is what you wear under your blouse/shirt when it is very cold. The sleeveless jumper thing we used to call a tank-top, can't think what they are called now.

 

I think they are still called tank-tops, at least in the UK. Chandler in Friends always wore them, but called them "sweater vests". Vest tops over here are worn in the summer, mostly by girls - they are what Americans call a tank. They are the same basic shape as the vest that is worn under a shirt in the winter as underwear - that being what the Americans call an "undershirt" '. What the Americans know as a vest, we would call a "waistcoat" :roll:

 

Jude, what you know as pumps, we know as "court shoes". Here pumps are either flat ballet style shoes, or canvas sports shoes. And once you start on the names for sport shoes in the UK, you can go on forever. The shoes that really divide the nation are canvas sports shoes worn by children for PE (what you would know in the US as Phys Ed). They are not so removed from Kung Fu slippers, being made of black canvas with elastic inserts. Here in the West country, and in Wales, they would be called "daps". In the South East, they are more often known as "plimsolls". In the Midlands and a mite further North, they are "pumps" and in the North East and Scotland they are called "sand shoes". The Irish call them "gutties".

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Jude, what you know as pumps, we know as "court shoes". Here pumps are either flat ballet style shoes, or canvas sports shoes.

WHAT??? :lol: that is hilarious :p

 

And once you start on the names for sport shoes in the UK, you can go on forever. The shoes that really divide the nation are canvas sports shoes worn by children for PE (what you would know in the US as Phys Ed). They are not so removed from Kung Fu slippers, being made of black canvas with elastic inserts. Here in the West country, and in Wales, they would be called "daps". In the South East, they are more often known as "plimsolls". In the Midlands and a mite further North, they are "pumps" and in the North East and Scotland they are called "sand shoes". The Irish call them "gutties".

:neutral: just how do you guys communicate? it almost sounds like you need a translator as soon as you are an hour's drive away from home. :wink:

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